Plain English Blog

The future of money?


Andrew Pegler – 27 May 2011 … could be far less about dollars and dinars and more about thin air. Peer-to-peer networks are a great way to share things without exchanging cash. Right now hundreds of peer-to-peer marketplaces across the globe use new technologies to barter, swap, share and donate stuff as part of a flourishing trend called collaborative consumption. A handful of start-ups, driven by online gaming technology, are… Continue reading →


Jim Morrison and the AUD


Andrew Pegler – 13 May 2011 Yep, the little dollar that could just keeps on coulding. As LA man Jim Morrison once opined in LA Women, it looks set to “keep on risin’”. The latest culprit is something called the carry trade. This is where investors borrow in a currency that has low interest rates (for example, the Japanese yen), and then invest that money by lending it in a… Continue reading →


What on Earth is a patchwork economy?


There’s been a lot of “patchwork” babble lately. Read on for the plain English translation… Right now some parts of the economy are rockin’ while other bits are being rolled. In the rockin’ corner we have the Aussie diggers and drillers who are filling up tankers bound for nation-building projects in Asia. The diggers and drillers are announcing record profits and it don’t look like stopping anytime soon, folks. Meanwhile,… Continue reading →


The sixth wave of innovation


Posted by Andrew Pegler on May 04, 2011 There’s a brave new world coming and it wants your leftover pizza. We live in a wasteful world. But imagine if all this waste was not only useful but a driver of the global economy. Well you’ve just glimpsed the future, according to the writings of James Bradfield Moody and Bianca Nogrady in The Sixth Wave. Since the Industrial Revolution, the economy… Continue reading →


They were the daze my friends…


Andrew Pegler – 21 January 2011 Sorry folks, the pre-GFC halcyon days of low interest rates are gonski. Wayne and crew may be getting on their high horse and making it easy to transfer your business between banks, but they won’t have a significant effect on the cost of borrowing. Cost of borrowing? Our banks have to pay interest rates on the money THEY borrow, from the big banks overseas…. Continue reading →


The Year That Will Be


Andrew Pegler – 7 January 2011 Within a decade we’ll be sentimental for the days when the U.S. was economic superpower and global stabiliser. The peace and prosperity we’ve enjoyed since the Berlin Wall fell in 1989 (and arguably since the end of WWII) is unparalleled. But like air, you’ll only notice when it’s gone. Having world-leading powers – Germany, Japan and the U.S. – all bonded by the mutual… Continue reading →


The Year That Was


Andrew Pegler – 7 January 2011 Within a decade we’ll be sentimental for the days when the U.S. was economic superpower and global stabiliser. The peace and prosperity we’ve enjoyed since the Berlin Wall fell in 1989 (and arguably since the end of WWII) is unparalleled. But like air, you’ll only notice when it’s gone. Having world-leading powers – Germany, Japan and the U.S. – all bonded by the mutual… Continue reading →


Ireland: What’s gone on over Eire?


Andrew Pegler – 3 December 2010 How did Ireland suddenly go from the Celtic tiger to the Celtic basket case? It grew too fast During the 1990s to early 2000s Ireland went from being the poor man of the EU franchise to one of its richest. Before then it was a bit of a joke. In fact there was an industry around Irish jokes (“Did you hear about the Irish… Continue reading →


What the hell are the banks’ funding costs?


Andrew Pegler – 26 November 2010 Are the banks just gouging scoundrels or is there something to this “funding costs” malarkey? As we all know the big four banks shared a $22 billion dollars profit this year, which is pretty good work if you can get it. The Super funds were happy and shareholders were grinning, but then they went and wrecked it all by saying something like let’s hike… Continue reading →


Howling “Wolf”


Andrew Pegler – 12 November 2010 James Wolfensohn – not the 1950s Chicago blues legend – reckons Australia is missing the Asian boat and that the US will be stuffed for years. James Wolfensohn is an Australian-born investment banker who became president of the World Bank in 1995. He reckons Australia hasn’t really woken up to the global shift east yet. The “Wolf” reads a lot. He gets out heaps…. Continue reading →


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